Monday, 31 October 2016

Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 SATs

National Curriculum assessments are a series of educational assessments, colloquially known as Sats or SATs (see Terminology section), used to assess the attainment of children attending maintained schools in England. They comprise a mixture of teacher-led and test-based assessment depending on the age of the pupils. This test is unrelated to the US college admission test, the SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test or Scholastic Assessment Test). 
The assessments are completed at the end of each Key Stage and record attainment in terms of National Curriculum attainment levels, numbered between 1 and 8. The expectations for each stage are set out as follows:
Nói nôm na để dễ hiểu là cứ kết thúc một Key Stage là tất cả các trẻ trên toàn UK phải dự thi một kỳ thi SATs để đánh giá trình độ của mỗi trẻ đang học tại trường. Và xét nghiệm này không liên quan đến kết quả kiểm tra nhập học vào các trường Đại học Mỹ, SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test)

Key Stage 1(KS1) is the legal term for the two years of schooling in maintained schools in England and Wales normally known as Year 1 and Year 2, when pupils are aged between 5 and 7. This Key Stage normally covers pupils during infant school, although in some cases this might form part of a first or primary school.

During Year 2, teacher assessment is carried out in the core subjects of EnglishMathematics and Science. In English, teachers are required to record a level in the three strands of Reading, Writing, and Speaking & Listening.[5] To assist teachers in arriving at an assessed level, tests and tasks can be completed in reading, writing and mathematics. These are normally taken during May

What tests do children take at the end of Year 2?

There are papers in:
  • Reading (2 papers, 40 marks, about 70 minutes)
  • Mathematics (2 papers, 60 marks, about 55 minutes)
  • English grammar, punctuation and spelling (2 papers, 40 marks, about 35 minutes)
Your child’s school will decide when in May to administer the tests. Tests are not strictly timed and children will be given breaks between the papers.

How are the tests marked?

At Key Stage 1, the teachers in your child’s school will mark the SATs papers. The mark your child gets in each test is called the ‘raw score’ (out of 40 for Reading, out of 60 for Mathematics, out of 40 for Grammar, punctuation and spelling). This ‘raw score’ for each test will be translated into a ‘scaled score’, which will show how well your child has done against the expected standard. Children need to achieve a scaled score of 100 to meet the expected standard. Above 100 means they are exceeding the expected standard; below 100 means they are still working towards the expected standard.

Reading:

What happens in the Reading test?

There are two papers in the Reading test, each worth 20 marks. Each may include fiction, non-fiction and poetry. Children answer comprehension questions to show their understanding of the texts.
In Paper 1, children are given a booklet that contains a selection of short texts to read (between 400 and 700 words). There are questions to answer at various points within each text with space for children to write their answers. The test lasts approximately 30 minutes.
In Paper 2, children are given a booklet of longer texts (between 800 and 1100 words) and questions in a separate answer booklet. The test lasts approximately 40 minutes.
Paper 2 is more challenging than Paper 1, but in each paper easier questions appear at the beginning and more difficult ones later on.

What kinds of questions are there?

There will be a mixture of question types. In some, your child will need to choose an answer (selected responses). For others, they will need to write their own answer (short and extended responses).
Examples of selected response questions include:
  • Multiple choice, e.g. What is Lucy looking for in the story? Tick one of the boxes below.
  • Ranking/ordering, e.g. Number the events below to show the order in which they happen in the story.
  • Matchinge.g. Match the character to what they do in the story.
  • Labellinge.g. Label the text to show the title.
Examples of short response questions include:
  • Find and copye.g. Find and copy one word that shows how Lucy is feeling.
  • Short responsee.g. What does Lucy eat?
Examples of extended response questions include:
  • Open-ended responsee.g. Why did Lucy write the letter to her grandmother? Give two reasons.

Mathematics:

What happens in the Mathematics test?

There are two papers in the Mathematics test. One focuses on simple arithmetic and is worth 25 marks. One focuses on mathematical reasoning and is worth 35 marks. In each paper the questions appear in order of difficulty.
In Paper 1: arithmetic, children answer 25 context-free questions to test their fluency with number and calculation skills. They may not use calculators, rulers or any number apparatus to help them. In the test booklet, space is provided for children to use for working out, but they should write their answers in the answer box. The test lasts approximately 20 minutes, so children with good mental arithmetic skills will have a better chance of completing all the questions.
In Paper 2: reasoning, children answer questions to test their understanding of number, measures, geometry and statistics. The teacher will read the first 5 questions and children must listen and write their answer in their booklet. After this children have approximately 30 minutes to read and answer the remaining questions in the booklet. Some questions involve a problem-solving context. Some questions prompt children to show their working and are worth 2 marks. Children may use rulers, but are not allowed calculators or any other number apparatus.

What kinds of questions are there?

In Paper 1: arithmetic, all the questions will be context-free calculations, for example:
  • 17 – 6 = [ ]
  • [ ] + 5 = 9
  • 8 x 10 = [ ]
  • 35 ÷ 5 = [ ]
  • 65 + [ ] = 93
  • ¾ of 40 = [ ]
In Paper 2: reasoning , there will be a mixture of question types. In some, your child will need to choose an answer (selected responses). For others, they will need to write, draw or complete a table to give their answer (constructed responses), sometimes in a problem-solving context. In some questions, children can gain an extra mark for showing their working.
Examples of selected response questions include:
  • Multiple choice, e.g.
    Look at the shapes. Tick the hexagon.
    One shape is in the wrong place on the sorting grid. Draw a cross on it.
  • True/False or Yes/No, e.g.
    Do these calculations have the same answer? Write yes or no next to each.
    8 + 2 and 2 + 8
    8 x 2 and 2 x 8
    8 – 2 and 2 – 8
    8 ÷ 2 and 2 ÷ 8
Examples of constructed response questions include:
  • Constrained question, e.g.
  • Complete the number sentence below.
    3 x 8 = 2 x [ ]
  • Less constrained question, e.g.
  • Amy plants 4 rows of carrots. There are 3 carrots in each row. A rabbit eats two of the carrots. How many carrots are left? Show your working.

English Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling:

What happens in the English grammar, punctuation and spelling test?

There are two papers in the English grammar, punctuation and spelling test . The first paper is an aural spelling test. The second test includes questions on grammar, punctuation and vocabulary. In each paper the questions appear in order of difficulty. Both are worth 20 marks.
In Paper 1: spelling, children are given an answer booklet containing 20 sentences with a missing word in each sentence. For each sentence, your child’s teacher will read aloud the missing word, then the whole sentence, and then the missing word again. Children must spell the missing word correctly, including any necessary capital letters or apostrophes, to gain a mark. The test will last approximately 15 minutes.
In Paper 2: questions, children are given a booklet containing various questions that assess their understanding of grammar, punctuation and vocabulary. The test will last approximately 20 minutes.

What kinds of questions are there?

There will be a mixture of question types. In some, your child will need to choose an answer (selected responses). For some, they will need to write their own answer (constructed responses).
Examples of selected response questions include:
  • Multiple choice, e.g.
  • Tick one box to show where a comma should go in the sentence below.
    Circle the verbs in the sentence below.
    Underline the sentence that uses capital letters correctly.
  • Matchinge.g. Draw lines to match the words that have the same meaning.
Examples of constructed response questions include:
  • Complete / correct / rewritee.g. Complete the sentence below with the missing punctuation mark.
  • Write, e.g.
  • Write one word to complete the sentence below in the past tense.
    Write a command including the word ‘Look’.
  • Explaine.g. The sentence below has an apostrophe missing. Explain why it needs an apostrophe.

Key Stage 2 (KS2) is the legal term for the four years of schooling in maintained schools in England and Wales normally known as Year 3, Year 4, Year 5 and Year 6, when the pupils are aged between 7 and 11.
During May in the final year of Key Stage 2, children in state-funded schools (and independent schools if they so choose) undertake three National Curriculum Tests: reading; spelling, grammar and punctuation;[11] and Mathematics (2 reasoning papers and as of 2016, an arithmetic paper). Science tests are taken by a selected sample of schools to monitor national performance in science. Because the science sampling tests are to collect evidence on national performance, schools and pupils do not receive results.

What tests do children take at the end of Year 6?

There are papers in:
  • Reading (1 paper, 50 marks, 60 minutes)
  • Mathematics (3 papers, 110 marks, 110 minutes)
  • English grammar, punctuation and spelling (2 papers, 70 marks, 60 minutes)
Tests will take place the week beginning 8 May 2017. Tests are strictly timed, but children will be given breaks between the papers.

How are the tests marked?

At Key Stage 2, the SATs papers are marked externally by trained markers. The mark your child gets in each test is called the ‘raw score’ (out of 50 for Reading, out of 110 for Mathematics, out of 70 for English grammar, punctuation and spelling). This ‘raw score’ for each test will be translated into a ‘scaled score’, which will show how well your child has done against the expected standard. Children need to achieve a scaled score of 100 to meet the expected standard. Above 100 means they are exceeding the expected standard; below 100 means they are still working towards the expected standard. You will receive your child’s raw score and scaled score for each test and confirmation of whether or not they have achieved the expected standard.

Reading:

What happens in the Reading test?

There is only one paper in the Reading test, worth 50 marks. The paper will cover a selection of texts with between 1500 and 2300 words for children to read, including fiction, non-fiction and poetry. Children will be given a reading booklet and a separate answer booklet containing comprehension questions about each text. Easier texts will appear first in the reading booklet. The test will last one hour.

What kinds of questions are there?

There will be a mixture of question types including 1-mark, 2-mark and 3-mark questions. In some questions, your child will need to choose an answer (selected responses) by ticking, drawing lines or circling. For some, they will need to write their own answer (short or extended constructed responses). The length of the answer expected will be shown by the space given for the answer, e.g. a short line or box for one-word answers, a few lines for a sentence or two, or a large box for a detailed answer to explain an opinion.
Examples of selected response questions include:
  • Multiple choice, e.g.
    Where would you be most likely to see this text? Tick one of the options below.
  • Circle the correct option to complete each sentence below.
  • Ranking/orderinge.g. Number the events below to show the order in which they happen in the story.
  • Matching, e.g. Match the events below to the year in which they happened.
  • Labellinge.g. Label the text to show the title.
Examples of short constructed response questions include:
  • Find and copye.g. Find and copy one word on page 9 that suggests Malone feels part of the team of explorers.
  • Short response, e.g.
    How did Anousheh’s trip into space make history?
    What is the tremendous monster in the poem?
Examples of extended constructed response questions include:
  • Open-ended response, e.g.
    Look at the paragraph beginning ‘Once upon a time …’. How does the writer increase the tension throughout this paragraph? Explain fully, referring to the text in your answer.
    Based on what you have read, what does the last paragraph suggest might happen to the explorers next? Use evidence from this paragraph to support your prediction.

Mathematics:

What happens in the Mathematics test?

There are three papers in the Mathematics test. The first focuses on arithmetic and is worth 40 marks. The other two papers focus on mathematical reasoning and are worth 35 marks each. In each paper the questions appear in order of difficulty.
In Paper 1: arithmetic, children answer context-free calculations to test their confidence across the range of mathematical operations. The majority of questions are worth 1 mark, but 2 marks will be available for long multiplication and long division. In the test booklet, space is provided for children to use for working out, but they should write their answers in the answer box. Children have 30 minutes to complete the test, so children with good mental arithmetic skills will have a better chance of answering all the questions.
In Paper 2 and Paper 3: reasoning, children answer questions to test their mathematical fluency and skills in problem solving and reasoning with number, measures, geometry and statistics. Children have 40 minutes to complete each paper. Some questions are set in a context and some prompt children to show their method to gain extra marks.
Children may use a ruler, angle measurer or protractor, and a mirror, but are not allowed to use calculators in any of the papers.

What kinds of questions are there?

In Paper 1: arithmetic, all the questions will be context-free calculations, for example:
  • 979 + 100 = [ ]
  • 472 – 9 = [ ]
  • 1.28 x 100 = [ ]
  • 630 ÷ 9 = [ ]
  • 42 = [ ]
  • 20% of 1500 = [ ]
  • 1/4 x 1/8 = [ ]
  • 234,897 – 45,996 = [ ]
  • 20% of 1500 = [ ]
In Paper 2 and Paper 3: reasoning, there will be a mixture of question types. In some, your child will need to choose an answer (selected responses). For others, they will need to write their own answer (constructed responses), sometimes from a problem-solving context.
Examples of selected response questions include multiple choice, matching and true/false questions.
Examples of constructed response questions include:
  • Constrained question, e.g
    Look at this number: 23,451.96
    Write the digit that is in the hundreds place.
    Write the digit that is in the hundredths place.
  • Less constrained question, e.g.
    On Saturday Lara read 2/5 of her book. On Sunday she read the other 90 pages to finish the book. How many pages are there in Lara’s book? Show your method.

English Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling:

What happens in the English grammar, punctuation and spelling test?

There are two papers in the English grammar, punctuation and spelling test. The first paper includes questions on grammar, punctuation and vocabulary and is worth 50 marks. The second paper is an aural spelling test worth 20 marks. In each paper the questions appear in order of difficulty.
In Paper 1: questions, children are given a booklet containing various questions that assess their understanding of grammar, punctuation and vocabulary. The test will last 45 minutes.
In Paper 2: spelling, children are given an answer booklet containing 20 sentences with a missing word in each sentence. For each sentence, your child’s teacher will read aloud the missing word, then the whole sentence, and then the missing word again. Children must spell the missing word correctly, including any necessary capital letters, apostrophes and hyphens, to gain a mark. The test will last approximately 15 minutes.

What kinds of questions are there?

There will be a mixture of question types. In some, your child will need to choose an answer (selected responses). For some, they will need to write their own answer (constructed responses).
Examples of selected response questions include:
  • Multiple choice, e.g.
    Tick the sentence that must end with a question mark.
    Underline all the conjunctions in the sentence below.
    Circle the two words in the sentence below that are synonyms of each other.
  • Matchinge.g. Draw a line to match each prefix to the correct word so that it makes a new word.
Examples of constructed response questions include:
  • Complete / correct / rewrite, e.g. Rewrite the sentence below, adding a subordinate clause.
  • Writee.g. Write a sentence using the word cover as a noun.
  • Explaine.g. Explain how the use of commas changes the meaning in the two sentences below.
Một số tài liệu luyện SATs cho KS1 và KS2:
* Example questions are taken from the National curriculum assessments: test frameworks and National curriculum assessments: 2016 sample materials published by the Standards and Testing Agency on www.gov.uk in June 2015.
* The Oxford Reading Tree
* Kênh Game luyện SATS: http://www.bbc.co.uk/education
* Sách hỗ trợ về Grammar, Punctuation:

* Nội dung về Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling:
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

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